Luther’s Sacristy Prayer – Where’s it from?

I’ve seen this wonderful prayer several times online and elsewhere, but I cannot find a citation (and several searches on Luther’s Works on Libronix Digital Library hasn’t helped, either).  Anybody know where it comes from?  Thanks!

Lord God, Thou hast made me a pastor and teacher in the Church. Thou seest how unfit I am to administer rightly this great and responsible office; and had I been without Thy aid and counsel I would surely have ruined it long ago. Therefore do I invoke Thee. How gladly do I desire to yield and consecrate my heart and mouth to this ministry. I desire to teach the congregation. I, too desire ever to learn and to keep Thy Word my constant companion and to meditate thereupon earnestly. Use me as Thy instrument in Thy service. Only do not Thou forsake me, for if I am left to myself, I will certainly bring it all to destruction. Amen.

About Chris Duckworth

Spouse. Parent. Lutheran Pastor. National Guardsman. Political Junkie. Baseball Fan.
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5 Responses to Luther’s Sacristy Prayer – Where’s it from?

  1. It’s not one I recognize. I’m struck by all of the references to teaching and the complete lack of reference to Sacraments. Whoever penned it saw the presider’s role as foremost a didactic one rather than a priestly one.

  2. revhrod says:

    Ask Wengert. He’s on sabbattical, maybe he has some free time for a little text search> 😉

  3. Eric says:

    Luther understood the office of “pastor” as one where the Word was preached and the sacraments were administered rightly. Even though “sacrament” are not specifically mentioned I still see that as part of the prayer.
    I use this prayer weekly before I write my sermons because I understand that I am not a good writer, preacher or speaker and it that were left up to me I would certainly bring it all to ruin.

  4. Thanks for the comment over on FrontRowLutheran.com about Faith Inkubators.
    From what I understand, after Augsburg Fortress came out with Here We Stand, which (in my opinion) appears to have copied Faith Ink’s approach, Faith Ink re-evaluated their entire curriculum and made their best effort to make a better product than Here We Stand. So far, I would say that the Living Faith Journal is a better curriculum tool for confirmation than The Lutheran Handbook, but I’ll guess I’ll have to see as the year unfolds.
    I also pretty much followed Pastor Steve’s lead, who had taken the time to look at various curricula and chose to use Faith Ink over the next couple of years. Since we’re working together, I figured (and trusted that) he knew what he was doing. 🙂

  5. Project Wittenberg offers the following citation for this particular Sacristy Prayer: Dr. Martin Luthers Werke, (Weimar: Hermann Boehlaus Nachfolger, 1909), Band 43, pp. 513. See it here. FWIW, Doberstein’s The Minister’s Prayer Book offers two Sacristy Prayers of Luther, the one you quoted is second (though translated yet a third way). I use the first one, and have quoted both in my blog today. spt+

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